Tips for Displaying Art

Urquhart Castle, Scotland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art infrared photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Urquhart Castle, Scotland
Congratulations!  You have purchased art you love, but now how do you display it?
Art gives a room esthetic appeal.  You can use art to project a certain feeling to a space.  The key to decorating successfully with art is to give thought to where it will be displayed before hanging it on the wall.
First, get art professionally framed.  Putting beautifully crafted art in a substandard frame detracts from the visual appeal of the art.
Before hanging the art on the wall, do a layout of the piece or pieces on paper and trace them.  Cut out the patterns and tape them on the wall.  Use this as your guide to hanging your art.  Planning will save your walls from too many unwanted holes!
Hang art at eye level (approximately 60 to 66 inches from the floor).
When hanging art over a couch, place the artwork 6 to 8 inches from the top of the couch.
Use geometric shapes to guide you on how to place the artwork.  For example, hang four small art pieces together to form a square.  Conversely, hang three pieces together along a horizontal line in a row.
When hanging several pieces of art together, place the most significant piece in the center with smaller pieces around it.
Group smaller pieces of art together.  Hang small pieces two inches apart.  Consider hanging smaller artwork in a small space such as a bathroom or kitchen.  Adding art to small space creates an intimate feeling.  Also, consider placing small artwork in bookcases and on tables.
When hanging several larger pieces together, place them three inches apart—alternatively, lean heavier pieces on a table against a wall.
Use quality picture hanging hardware (available in hardware stores).  Select hardware by the weight of the artwork.
Lastly, enjoy your art!
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Five Reasons to Decorate with Real Artwork

Clouds over Blackwater Refuge, Eastern Shore, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Clouds over Blackwater Refuge, Eastern Shore, Maryland
Five Reasons to Decorate with Real Artwork
    1. Hanging real art in your home and business adds a touch of sophistication and class.
    2. The art you select expresses your uniqueness and communicates who you are.
    3. Art adds feeling and texture to a room.
    4. You gain the satisfaction of supporting real artists instead of supporting big box stores that sell items made by machines in other countries.
    5. You have the opportunity to develop a personal relationship with the artist-getting invited to VIP specials and events.
Please visit my gallery pages to view and shop for real art.
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Infrared Photography

Fine Art Infrared Photography

Blackwater Refuge, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art infrared photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Clouds over Blackwater Refuge, Eastern Shore, Maryland
“Real vision is the ability to see the invisible” – Jonathan Swift
What is Infrared Photography?
Infrared photography is a look into the invisible world.
The human eye can only see wavelengths from 400 nm-700 nm (from purple to red); infrared light is beyond 700nm to 1200nm.
There are two ways to capture infrared light: 1) use infrared film, or 2) use a converted digital camera specifically for infrared photography.
Infrared photography produces very distinct effects which make them aesthetically pleasing. The most striking difference is the “Wood Effect” (named after Robert W. Wood), where leaves reflect light giving them a bright white look. Robert W. Wood is considered the father of infrared photography. Infrared photography produces surreal color landscapes and high-contrast black and white photographs.
My Introduction to Infrared Photography in Black and White
About 20 years ago, I saw the work of Sir Simon Marsden, a British photographer who specialized in infrared photography.  I was awestruck by his ethereal and dramatic images. Inspired by Simon Marsden, I began a long quest to learn infrared photography.
At the time, I could not find any classes on infrared film photography, so I taught myself. I learned infrared photography by reading, researching, and spending lots of time practicing. In 2008, I bought my first converted digital camera specifically for infrared photography. I am now on my second converted digital camera and continue to explore the wonderment of infrared. Infrared enables me to create dramatic, high-contrast black and white images, which I love.

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Ten Things To Know Before You Visit Ireland

Poulnabrone Dolmen (Portal Tomb), Burren, Clare, Ireland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Poulnabrone Dolmen (Portal Tomb), Burren, Clare, Ireland
Ten Things To Know Before You Visit Ireland
    1. Don’t ask people about “The Troubles” or any politics.
    2. Be prepared to be referred to as a “Yank” (those from America).
    3. Don’t say, my last name is Murphy. Do you know where my family is from?
    4. Pack light – the cars are tiny.
    5. Avoid driving if possible.
    6. Drinking under the influence is strictly enforced. Have a designated driver.
    7. Eat the local, fresh food.
    8. Be prepared for the weather – pack layers and rain gear.
    9. Mind your manners – say “please and thank you”, wait your turn, don’t be demanding and practice patience.
    10. Don’t kiss the Blarney Stone – the locals pee on it!

To view my black and white photographs of Ireland, visit

Ireland Gallery

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Reasons to Visit Oxford, Maryland

Reasons to visit Oxford, Maryland

Things to Do in Oxford, Maryland

Watermen Mural, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Watermen Mural Oxford, Maryland
Oxford, Maryland, is a waterfront, historic town located in Talbot County on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.
Oxford originated in 1683 as a major shipping port for tobacco until the American Revolutionary War.
After the war, the economic crop changed from tobacco to wheat and the town economically thrived on the oyster industry.
Today, Oxford is populated with residents, watermen, and tourists. It is a quaint, quiet place to enjoy the serene waters of the Eastern Shore of Maryland.
Sail on the Tred Avon River
Tred Avon River, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Tred Avon River Oxford MD
Buy picnic provisions from the Oxford Market and Deli at 203 S. Morris St.
Oxford Market, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Oxford Market
Picnic at the waterfront park on Morris St.
Oxford Park on Morris Street, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Oxford Park on Morris St
Spend the day at Strand Beach on East Strand Rd., and search for sea glass.
Strand Beach, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Strand Beach, Oxford, Maryland
Stay and/or dine at the historic Robert Morris Inn and Tavern.
The Robert Morris Inn, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
The Robert Morris Inn, Oxford, Maryland
Learn about local Black history at the John Wesley Church and graveyard – Oxford Rd.
John Wesley Church, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art infrared photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
John Wesley Church, Oxford, Maryland
Pay respects to original residents of Oxford at the Oxford Cemetery. Famous graves include Tench Tilghman, who was the Aide-de-Camp to General George Washington.
Historic Cemetery, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art black and white photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Historic Cemetery, Oxford, Maryland

 

Bike ride around the town.
Get an up-close view of the beautiful homes and gardens. The terrain is flat and perfect for biking.
Historic House, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Historic House, Oxford, Maryland
Enjoy a ride on the Oxford – Bellevue Ferry
The Oxford – Bellevue Ferry links Bellevue (near St. Michaels) and Oxford across the Tred Avon River.
This ferry has been operated since 1683 and is known as the oldest privately owned ferry in the United States.
Enjoy the scenery during the 10-minutes long ferry ride. The ferry runs from April to November.
Visit www. Oxfordferry.com for more information.
The Oxford - Bellevue Ferry, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
The Oxford – Bellevue Ferry, Oxford, Maryland
Check out special events throughout the year.
Events include the resident artist studio tours, garden tours, Paint Oxford Days, Oxford Day, Fine Arts Fair, Cardboard Boat Race, the Oxford Regatta,· Waterfowl weekend, and Christmas on the Creek.
Artist Studio, Oxford, Maryland, standalone prints, framed, and on canvas, fine art photography by Jacqueline LaRocca
Artist Studio, Oxford, Maryland
For more information on visiting Oxford, Maryland, and other parts of Talbot County,
visit: https://tourtalbot.org/resources/maps-brochures/ 
To view and buy photographs of Oxford, Maryland, and the Eastern Shore of Maryland, please visit my online gallery at
https://jacquelinelarocca.com/galleries-maryland/

 

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